There is a huge value in taking practice tests because they help you evaluate your learning. Based on how you perform on these practice tests, you will decide if you are ready for the real test.

Quizzes and practice test are part of our learning methods that use best practices such as interleaving (mixing several related skills together) and repetition. These methods help your brain transfer information into long-term memory so it can be easily accessed during the test.

Mini-Quizzes

After each video lesson, there is a mini-quiz, so you can immediately check your understanding of the lesson.

Longer Diagnostic Practice Tests

These diagnostic tests will check which concepts you understand and which ones require your attention. GED Subject Modules have longer practice tests at the end.

Score Your Practice Tests

Make sure to score your tests and understand the answer explanations. If you make a mistake or don’t know a question, you should write that one down in a notebook so you can go back to it and fill in the gaps in your knowledge.

Analyze Your Wrong Answers

To repeat the point, you don’t want to just score your test and move on. This score is a signal to you and what you know and what you need to learn.
You should figure out why you missed the question. Was it lack of knowledge, a wrong guess, or carelessness?
If the first, you should brush up on your understanding.
If the second, work on refining your process of elimination skills.
If you find yourself overly rationalizing or justifying an answer, it’s probably a “distractor” – there’s only one 100% correct answer choice. Figure out what was distracting you and get to the core of what the answer choices are communicating.
Finally, if the error was due to carelessness, continued practice will help you improve your ability to read and comprehend a question and answer it quickly and efficiently. That’s why timing yourself is such a good idea when taking practice tests. Which leads me to my next suggestion…

Simulate Testing Conditions

Practice tests will give you the best “real test” experience if you simulate the testing conditions you’ll encounter on test day. Give yourself exactly 70 minutes, no more, no less, and sit in a quiet space with few distractions.

After all your studying, you want to make sure you’ll be able to get to all the questions and answer them thoroughly in the hour you’ll be given.